Meet our team

A diverse group of talented professionals

Meet our team

A diverse group of talented professionals


Daryl Cooper

Portfolio Manager, Director of Wealth Management

Daryl Cooper

In 1995, I formed the investment advisory service called Cooper Wealth Management. I have been truly blessed to have found a passion that doesn’t feel like work and this is reflected in our client retention and satisfaction. Our team is now called Cooper Schneider Financial to recognize the input and importance of my partner; Wealth Advisor, Colleen Schneider.
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Colleen Schneider

Wealth Advisor

Colleen Schneider

Working closely with Daryl and the rest of the Cooper Schneider Financial team, including the extended team of specialists at Scotia Wealth Management, Colleen is extremely detail-oriented and leaves no stone uncovered. She takes a solution focused approach, offering financial planning that is conservative, reliable and designed for long term success.
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Wealth management services

What makes us unique

We provide a unique wealth management process that focuses on affluent clients who aspire to a work optional lifestyle. Our process stands out amongst the rest because we do it for people who invest and are tired of the ordinary. We do not accept mediocrity. We are architects of a better way to managing your wealth.

Our unique method – the RBI Bridging Formula is a process driven approach that involves planning and protection. It is a process that is objective, disciplined and transparent.

We work with like-minded people that appreciate the value, enthusiasm, passion and knowledge that we bring to the office every day.

We became wealth advisors to help people tune out the noise and focus on what matters to them—things they can control—so that they can face the future with anticipation, instead of apprehension.

Contrary to the old cliché what you don’t know can hurt you and ignorance is not bliss; financial health is a matter of choice, not chance. We became wealth advisors to help our clients to make more informed choices and take fewer chances. That is the harmony of wealth and risk management—integrated.

We learned long ago that financial success requires more than just judgment and ideas. It requires a process.

When we started, we attracted affluent clients from all walks of life who appreciated our process and client experience. This included farmers, retirees and professionals. Today, we primarily work with professionals, business owners/farmers and executives who, among other things, aspire to that work-optional lifestyle and want to secure their family’s investment legacy.

One of the primary characteristics of these clients is that they delegate their wealth management to a professional, allowing them to focus on what they really want to be doing; or what they are really good at.

We take a team approach to creating a client experience that is consistent. Each person on our team has bought into best practices that govern how we conduct ourselves with our clients.

We are vigilant defenders of wealth. We believe in full transparency in all that we do. We provide our clients with services that reflect their needs.

We understand that wealth advisors must have a defined process that can contribute to helping clients protect their wealth, enabling them to realize their dreams and sleep well at night.

We keep our client base to a minimum and only work with select clients who are a fit for what we provide. We do this so we can be all things to a few instead of attempting to be everything for everyone.

We utilize a process we termed the RBI Bridging Formula. This process is a truly unique wealth management system that fully understands that success for our clients involves diligence and attention to Planning and Process. Planning and Process are key elements in both Portfolio Management and Financial Planning and when combined, they formulate your Wealth Blueprint.

We realize that a jack of all trades is a master of none. Therefore, we utilize the services of our in-house team of specialists which includes two financial planners, a full team of life insurance experts, a chartered accountant for complex business strategies, private banking and a lawyer for estate and trust needs.

  • Financial Planning from Scotia Capital Inc.
  • Coverage from Scotia Wealth Insurance Services Inc.
  • Private Banking from the Bank of Nova Scotia
  • Estate and trust planning from Scotiatrust®, The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company

Our process is panoramic and all encompassing. It covers every piece of the financial puzzle and engages every service provider so that our clients always have the complete picture.

Our method is fluid and dynamic. It is not static and it is not transactional.

As our clients’ lives unfold, their needs will evolve. We act as the bridge to their financial aspirations.

  • We work at turning apprehension into anticipation
  • We are specialists—not generalists
  • We partner with an in-house team of wealth specialists
  • We believe that success comes from planning and is not left to chance
  • We fully understand that our clients want to sleep well at night and enjoy their lives

Our RBI Bridging Formula leaves no stone unturned. The planning and investment process is unique, conservative and disciplined.

We are accountable to our clients for we understand the crucial role we play in building and protecting their wealth.

Each day inspires us to strive to provide a service that we believe is unique from the mainstream.

We work out of our home base in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan with Scotia Wealth Management. Our office is on the 7th Floor of the Saskatoon Square office tower on the corner of 4th Avenue and 22nd Street.

In our experience, our affluent clients are mobile throughout Canada. In order to continue to provide them with the service they have come to expect and appreciate, we are licensed in five provinces and have active experience servicing accounts in each of these provinces.

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Keeping you up-to-date and informed


Market Watch for February 16, 2018

Global Portfolio Advisory Group

February 16, 2018

Big Picture

Stability returns

There was a welcome return to stability on global equity markets through Thursday as concerns about inflation, interest rates and bond yields dissipated. The one data point of worry this week – U.S. consumer prices – came and went without incident Wednesday despite the inflation gauge rising a more than expected 0.5% in January, up 2.1% from a year earlier. A second measure of inflation – the prices businesses charge for goods and services – also rose in January from a month earlier as the U.S. Producer Price Index advanced a seasonally adjusted 0.4%. From a year earlier, producer prices advanced 2.7%. Both indicators point to firming inflation south of the border which may force the U.S. Federal Reserve to quicken the pace or number of interest rate increases it has previously communicated. The Fed next meets March 20-21 and has pencilled in three quarter-percentage-point rate rises for 2018. Still on the inflation front, U.K. consumer prices held at 3% yoy in January from December with Bank of England policy makers telegraphing intensions for successive rate rises with the first potential move coming in May. Turning to Japan, the world’s third largest economy extended its longest streak of economic growth since the late 1980s after reporting annualized Q4 GDP growth of 0.5% from the previous quarter. Yoy GDP advanced 1.6% in 2017 – the fastest pace in seven years – which will reassure BoJ officials that the economy is generating stable, albeit moderate, growth. In Canada, the Liberal government announced it will table the federal budget February 27 and last Friday’s jobs report for January showed a net job loss of 88,000 positions, the steepest decline in nine years. Looking ahead, we’ll get a look at the U.K. employment situation next week as well as GDP data.

 

Markets

Stocks rebound

Most major North American stock benchmarks rebounded this week recovering much of the ground lost after two bruising weeks. For the four days covered in this report, the Dow added 1,010 pts. to close at 25,200, the S&P 500 gained 112 pts. to close at 2,731 and the Nasdaq moved ahead 382 pts. to settle at 7,256. In Canada, the TSX ended the period 317 pts. higher to close Thursday’s session at 15,391.

 

Equities/Strategy

Market correction not reflective of strong fundamentals

Equities: The combination of a market pullback and analysts upwardly revising their earnings estimates to reflect U.S. tax reform has caused the S&P500 blended 12-month forward price-to-earnings ratio to drop 7% from its recent peak. We believe this is a meaningful pullback, as the recent selling, in our opinion, has been disconnected from economic fundamentals (strong earnings growth, healthy labour dynamics). Thus, we retain our two-year-old equity overweight bias, with a geographical preference for Canada, Europe, Japan and emerging markets at the expense of the U.S. We believe commodity sectors (materials, energy), industrials and financials will comprise the top four performing sectors in 2018.

 

This publication has been prepared by ScotiaMcLeod, a division of Scotia Capital Inc. (SCI). This publication is intended as a general source of information and should not be considered as personal investment or tax advice. We are not tax advisors and we recommend that individuals consult with their professional tax advisor before taking any action based upon the information found in this publication. Opinions, estimates, and projections contained herein are our own as of the date hereof and are subject to change without notice. The information and opinions contained herein have been compiled or arrived at from sources believed reliable but no representation or warranty, express or implied, is made as to their accuracy or completeness. Neither SCI nor its affiliates accepts liability whatsoever for any loss arising from any use of this publication or its contents. This publication is not, and is not to be construed as, an offer to sell or solicitation of an offer to buy any securities and/or commodity futures contracts. SCI, its affiliates and/or their respective officers, directors, or employees may from time to time acquire, hold, or sell securities and/or commodities and/or commodity futures contracts mentioned herein as principal or agent. SCI and/or its affiliates may have acted as financial advisor and/or underwriter for certain of the corporations mentioned herein and may have received and may receive remuneration for same. All insurance products are sold through Scotia Wealth Insurance Services Inc., the insurance subsidiary of Scotia Capital Inc., a member of the Scotiabank Group. When discussing life insurance products, ScotiaMcLeod advisors are acting as Insurance Advisors (Financial Security Advisors in Quebec) representing Scotia Wealth Insurance Services Inc. This publication and all the information, opinions, and conclusions contained in it are protected by copyright. This report may not be reproduced in whole or in part, or referred to in any manner whatsoever, nor may the information, opinions, and conclusions contained in it be referred to without in each case the prior express consent of SCI.

 

Market Watch for February 9 2018

Global Portfolio Advisory Group

February 9, 2018

Big Picture

Markets wobble

Major global equity markets remained unsettled through Thursday taking their cue from U.S. stocks which were the most volatile in years over the four days covered in this report. Traders remain concerned that rising inflation could force the U.S. Federal Reserve to tighten monetary policy at a pace more than expected potentially shortening the nearly nine-year bull market. A recent jump in bond yields to multi-year highs also added to the nervousness as stocks may look relatively less attractive to risk-free Treasurys. Nevertheless, the U.S. market has solid underpinnings in economic growth, rising corporate earnings and a global economy that’s expanding. With regard to U.S. corporate earnings, roughly 80% of S&P 500 companies that have reported results for Q4 2017 have posted sales that beat analyst’s expectations which puts them on track for the most positive surprises since at least 2008 according to FactSet.  In central bank news, the Bank of England left interest rates unchanged at 0.5% Thursday at its regularly scheduled policy-setting meeting. BoE Governor Mark Carney did, however, say interest rates may need to rise at a steeper pace and earlier than previously thought with the first move potentially set for May.  In Washington, lawmakers reached a two-year budget deal breaking log jams over spending and immigration that led to a partial government shutdown last month. Also in Washington, Jerome Powell was sworn in Monday as the 16th U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman succeeding Janet Yellen.  Looking ahead, market watchers will be able to digest Canadian labour situation data today.

 

Markets

Turbulent trade 

U.S. stock benchmarks went on a wild ride this week with major indexes now in, or approaching correction territory – a 10% decline from their January 26 all-time highs. For the four days covered in this report, the Dow fell 1,660 pts. to close at 23,860, the S&P 500 gave back 181 pts. to end at 2,581 and the Nasdaq shed 463 pts. to settle at 6,777. In Canada, the TSX was also caught in the ups and downs with the index falling 541 pts. through Thursday to finish at 15,065.

Markets wobble

Major global equity markets remained unsettled through Thursday taking their cue from U.S. stocks which were the most volatile in years over the four days covered in this report. Traders remain concerned that rising inflation could force the U.S. Federal Reserve to tighten monetary policy at a pace more than expected potentially shortening the nearly nine-year bull market. A recent jump in bond yields to multi-year highs also added to the nervousness as stocks may look relatively less attractive to risk-free Treasurys. Nevertheless, the U.S. market has solid underpinnings in economic growth, rising corporate earnings and a global economy that’s expanding. With regard to U.S. corporate earnings, roughly 80% of S&P 500 companies that have reported results for Q4 2017 have posted sales that beat analyst’s expectations which puts them on track for the most positive surprises since at least 2008 according to FactSet.  In central bank news, the Bank of England left interest rates unchanged at 0.5% Thursday at its regularly scheduled policy-setting meeting. BoE Governor Mark Carney did, however, say interest rates may need to rise at a steeper pace and earlier than previously thought with the first move potentially set for May.  In Washington, lawmakers reached a two-year budget deal breaking log jams over spending and immigration that led to a partial government shutdown last month. Also in Washington, Jerome Powell was sworn in Monday as the 16th U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman succeeding Janet Yellen.  Looking ahead, market watchers will be able to digest Canadian labour situation data today.

 

Markets

Turbulent trade 

U.S. stock benchmarks went on a wild ride this week with major indexes now in, or approaching correction territory – a 10% decline from their January 26 all-time highs. For the four days covered in this report, the Dow fell 1,660 pts. to close at 23,860, the S&P 500 gave back 181 pts. to end at 2,581 and the Nasdaq shed 463 pts. to settle at 6,777. In Canada, the TSX was also caught in the ups and downs with the index falling 541 pts. through Thursday to finish at 15,065.

 

Equities/Strategy

Market correction not reflective of strong fundamentals

Strategy: Following a strong start to the year, global equity markets have experienced a sharp bout of volatility in recent days that wiped out much of January’s gains. While investor concern is normal during episodes of extreme market movements, we believe this latest bout of selling was overdue given the last market decline of just 5% or more occurred more than 18 months ago and the recent run-up in markets left market positioning unbalanced and thus vulnerable to a short-term correction. However, the medium-term outlook for markets remains constructive, in our view, underpinned by solid economic fundamentals and still-supportive policy settings. In particular, global economic growth remains at multi-year highs with recent data releases pointing to further forecast upgrades for 2018 in coming months. As well, the global recovery has broadened out impressively to every major economy in the world, leaving the economic recovery cycle more resilient to possible shocks and increasing the possible longevity of the recovery. This most recent correction has also helped to sharply improve market valuations, in our view. With risks of a recession over the coming year remaining very low, we view this latest market correction as an attractive opportunity to put any cash allocations to work.

 

 

This material does not include or constitute an investment recommendation, and is not intended to take into account the particular investment objectives, financial conditions, or needs of individual clients. Before acting on this material, you should consider whether it is suitable for your particular circumstances and talk to your investment advisor.

This publication has been prepared by ScotiaMcLeod, a division of Scotia Capital Inc. (SCI). This publication is intended as a general source of information and should not be considered as personal investment or tax advice. We are not tax advisors and we recommend that individuals consult with their professional tax advisor before taking any action based upon the information found in this publication. Opinions, estimates, and projections contained herein are our own as of the date hereof and are subject to change without notice. The information and opinions contained herein have been compiled or arrived at from sources believed reliable but no representation or warranty, express or implied, is made as to their accuracy or completeness. Neither SCI nor its affiliates accepts liability whatsoever for any loss arising from any use of this publication or its contents. This publication is not, and is not to be construed as, an offer to sell or solicitation of an offer to buy any securities and/or commodity futures contracts. SCI, its affiliates and/or their respective officers, directors, or employees may from time to time acquire, hold, or sell securities and/or commodities and/or commodity futures contracts mentioned herein as principal or agent. SCI and/or its affiliates may have acted as financial advisor and/or underwriter for certain of the corporations mentioned herein and may have received and may receive remuneration for same. All insurance products are sold through Scotia Wealth Insurance Services Inc., the insurance subsidiary of Scotia Capital Inc., a member of the Scotiabank Group. When discussing life insurance products, ScotiaMcLeod advisors are acting as Insurance Advisors (Financial Security Advisors in Quebec) representing Scotia Wealth Insurance Services Inc. This publication and all the information, opinions, and conclusions contained in it are protected by copyright. This report may not be reproduced in whole or in part, or referred to in any manner whatsoever, nor may the information, opinions, and conclusions contained in it be referred to without in each case the prior express consent of SCI.


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How to get in touch with our team

410 - 22nd Street East, Suite 700, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7K 5T6, Canada
(306) 343-3255 · (306) 664-1877